Dismantling the Constitution by not following it

“From the nature of man we may be sure that those who have power in their hands… will always when they can… increase it.”

– George Mason 1787

It is indisputable that all segments of government in the USA are bloating. Our national debt alone is $10 trillion. This is more debt than has been accumulated by all past presidents put together.

We are told only government, not the free market, can solve this crisis. It was Congress’ overspending and meddling in the banking industry by dictating the exponential growth of sub-prime loans and its coziness with international corporate CEOs that got us into this mess in the first place. Congress has abdicated its constitutional power of the purse strings and presidents have been implicit in this fiasco.

Presidents are expanding their power not defending the Constitution. The executive branch has even taken over the American auto industry and financial corporations, has appointed a “czar” for every almost issue and has increased executive orders that skirt the legislative process. Who knows what other executive tentacles are ready to poison or strangle other parts of our capitalist system.

The Supreme Court is not adhering to our constitution. Some Supreme Court justices are resorting to using international law to justify their decisions not the law and the Constitution of America. The transnational movement (One World government) places pressure on the Untied States to accept international agreements that would make our constitution null and void.

The lack of following the constitution is causing growth in our government and shrinkage in our freedom. The intrusion of government into our daily lives has been astonishing. Without accounting for all the astronomical increases in our national debt, the 50 percent of Americans who pay taxes work until May before completing the obligation to the IRS. Anyone improving his “castle” has to pay exorbitant permitting fees and then be afraid government will take his home for no other reason than to increase local tax revenue under a distortion of eminent domain.

The monstrous Homeland Security decisions are a case study of large bureaucracies limiting our freedoms. Citizens traveling by air are put through time consuming antics, such as putting only three-ounce bottles into a zip top bag, remove shoes, belts and be “wanded” by security even if they are 80 year-old cripples. Travelers have to arrive three hours before an international flight. Should there be delays in processing, even through no fault of the passenger, they will automatically be stopped from boarding that flight by the state department’s computer. The airline cannot process any tickets later than one hour before the flight because the State Department’s computers shut the process down. The State Department, located in Washington, DC, has the bureaucratic audacity to make a blanket decision at every airport in America without consideration for extenuating circumstances on the ground.

Big Brother’s shadow intrudes into daily life as government expands.

Former President Bush was ignorant about a compassionate and efficient big government. It does not better solve societal problems it causes more of them. The more people look to government to resolve their problems the more government will regulate and absorb the freedom of the people.

Our founders knew first hand that to maintain individual freedom government had to be held in check. Our founding fathers were worldly and well read men. They lived through the horrors of the tyrannical kingdom of George III and carefully studied philosophers and governments of the past to glean the best formula to organize a nation. They agreed citizens had natural and inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. These rights were not granted by the rulers but endowed by our creator.

These men wanted freedom for the individual not a government, to take their property and use it as their own awarding hoodlums that oppress moral citizens. Our constitution restrains our national government from robbing our freedom.

The founders built in checks and balances to force the three branches of government, the legislature, executive and judicial branches to share and counteract each other’s powers. The seven articles spelled out in concise and readable language that our constitution specifically limits these powers. By imposing these limits on a national government it should prevent the expansion and abuse of government into every aspect of our lives. There was such a desire to remain free, the Bill of Rights was added to the Constitution.

Again it instructed the national government what it could not do to citizens.

The constitution of the United States is the oldest still in practice. The lack of government schools teaching civics and law schools pushing an evolving and living constitution have made the sacred document practically a dead one to our youth. It must be resuscitated and revitalized to save the exceptionalism of America.

Our citizens must accept more responsibility for problems, not ask government for handouts. Every time government enters the door problems are compounded and motivation robbed. We The People are the force behind that which has made America great.

Government is directed by the people not the people directed by it. When power grabbing, parasitic politicians tell the people what to do things go haywire.

The Constitution is the only thing between decay, chaos, tyranny and us.

We need to respect this document by knowing and teaching it to our family and friends. Most importantly, We the People must study the voting record of our representatives to insure they are following the Constitution of the United States that they have sworn to uphold.

Dr. Maglio is the author of Invasion Within and Essential Parenting. He is a psychotherapist and the owner/director of Wider Horizons School. Visit: www.drmaglio.com.

Woman charged for relationship with boy, 17

BROOKSVILLE –
Clarification, April 27: The alleged victim’s mother claims that she was not the one to contact authorities and report the incident.

A 32-year-old woman was arrested Friday after she confessed to a months-long sexual relationship with a 17-year-old boy.
Her confession was made to the alleged victim’s mother, who contacted authorities on April 8. The woman went to the sheriff’s office the next day to make a recorded phone call to the suspect, Vikki Suiters, of 9521 Shaver Road.
During that phone call, Suiters reportedly admitted that she started having feelings for the boy in December 2008. She told the friend that she waited until he turned 17 before initiating a relationship in March, according to a report.
Suiters acknowledged over the phone that it was illegal to have sex with a minor and expressed fear that her children would be taken away by the Department of Children and Families, a report states.
An arrest warrant on a charge of sexual activity with a certain minor was issued and Suiters was subsequently arrested.

Controlled burns cast haze over eastern, central Hernando County

BROOKSVILLE –
Two controlled burns in the Withlacoochee State Forest are causing a haze of smoke in eastern and central Hernando County.

The fires in the Croom and Sugar Mill tracts are burning a combined 250 acres of dry underbrush. The burns are part of an ongoing effort at wildfire prevention, said Don Ruths, mitigation specialist for the Withlacoochee Forestry Center.

The smoke is expected to disperse by late this evening.

Big Cat Sanctuary Draws Volunteers, Visitors

SPRING HILL –
Conan the cougar sat on a wooden table within 10 feet of the children calling out to him.

His owner, Susan Moore called his name.

“Hi, Conan,” she said. “Hi, handsome.”

His head turned, but not toward Moore. His ears rose upward when he heard the distant sound of a plane’s engine. His gaze turned toward the sky.

Conan is half Florida panther and half South American cougar. Genetically, he is slightly handicapped. A calcium deficiency meant he has shorter-than-average legs. He has had health issues. That is why he is at Moore’s sanctuary.

Nonetheless, Conan is a killing machine.

Such an animal is different from other big cats, which often give clues as to when it is tired of being pestered or wants to attack.

They crouch. They show their teeth. They lower their ears. That is not the case with cougars, Moore warned.

“Its ears will still be up and it could be purring away, but they can take your arm off,” she said.

Moore cages a variety of big cats, from Bengal tigers to black leopards.

She also has a pot-bellied pig, white-tailed deer, emus and ostriches.

Four times per year, she hosts an open house. Most of the crowd spends their time staring into the cat cages.

Some of the animals like to pose and preen before the spectators while others are shy. One leopard climbed a tree while an African serval remained hidden under a blanket.

“We have the open houses in three-hour durations so it doesn’t put too much stress on them,” said Moore’s son, Jim.

He moved to Spring Hill in 2000 and he and his mother opened the sanctuary in 2001.

Volunteers come locally and overseas. Moore said people from the United Kingdom, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain and France have traveled to her 10-acre property and stayed there for a couple months to learn about the animals.

Sometimes they want a career working with big cats, but other times they go for the experience.

Most of the work consists of laying down food and water, yard work and cage cleaning.

“If you go into a cage with a cat you haven’t raised, you’re stupid,” Moore said.

A few minutes later, people gasped as an African male leopard growled and swatted at a female leopard. She was in heat and he was still healing from surgery. She was horny, but he was ornery.

The next open house likely will take place in July.

Moore’s Wildlife Survival Sanctuary is located at 18212 Booming Road, south of County Line Road.

Reporter Tony Holt can be reached at 352-544-5283 or wholt@hernandotoday.com.

Big Cat Sanctuary Draws Volunteers, Visitors

SPRING HILL –
Conan the cougar sat on a wooden table within 10 feet of the children calling out to him.

His owner, Susan Moore called his name.

“Hi, Conan,” she said. “Hi, handsome.”

His head turned, but not toward Moore. His ears rose upward when he heard the distant sound of a plane’s engine. His gaze turned toward the sky.

Conan is half Florida panther and half South American cougar. Genetically, he is slightly handicapped. A calcium deficiency meant he has shorter-than-average legs. He has had health issues. That is why he is at Moore’s sanctuary.

Nonetheless, Conan is a killing machine.

Such an animal is different from other big cats, which often give clues as to when it is tired of being pestered or wants to attack.

They crouch. They show their teeth. They lower their ears. That is not the case with cougars, Moore warned.

“Its ears will still be up and it could be purring away, but they can take your arm off,” she said.

Moore cages a variety of big cats, from Bengal tigers to black leopards.

She also has a pot-bellied pig, white-tailed deer, emus and ostriches.

Four times per year, she hosts an open house. Most of the crowd spends their time staring into the cat cages.

Some of the animals like to pose and preen before the spectators while others are shy. One leopard climbed a tree while an African serval remained hidden under a blanket.

“We have the open houses in three-hour durations so it doesn’t put too much stress on them,” said Moore’s son, Jim.

He moved to Spring Hill in 2000 and he and his mother opened the sanctuary in 2001.

Volunteers come locally and overseas. Moore said people from the United Kingdom, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain and France have traveled to her 10-acre property and stayed there for a couple months to learn about the animals.

Sometimes they want a career working with big cats, but other times they go for the experience.

Most of the work consists of laying down food and water, yard work and cage cleaning.

“If you go into a cage with a cat you haven’t raised, you’re stupid,” Moore said.

A few minutes later, people gasped as an African male leopard growled and swatted at a female leopard. She was in heat and he was still healing from surgery. She was horny, but he was ornery.

The next open house likely will take place in July.

Moore’s Wildlife Survival Sanctuary is located at 18212 Booming Road, south of County Line Road.

Reporter Tony Holt can be reached at 352-544-5283 or wholt@hernandotoday.com.

Cuts Smack Of Nepotism, Teachers Say

Hernando Today

SPRING HILL – As soon as the news hit that two out of three assistant principals at Explorer K-8 would not be coming back next year, the rumbling began.

The gist of the disquiet, according to stunned teachers: It’s more than a coincidence the lone assistant principal to keep her job there is Vivian Sweeney, the wife of school board member John Sweeney.

The other two assistant principals, Sue Roth and Dana Pearce, outshined Sweeney in their roles as administrators at the district’s newest school, teachers say. Pearce and Roth, teachers maintain, helped carry the 2,000-student school through its first year of growing pains exacerbated by overcrowding

All three assistant principals were in their first year in that role. School principal Dominick Ferello was in his first year as an administrator in Hernando and had never led a school that large in his career.

Ferello recommended Sweeney stay on and that Pearce and Roth go. Ferello is being reassigned to Westside Elementary School in Spring Hill.

“If a head had to be on the chopping block, the wrong AP was eliminated,” said one of half a dozen teachers interviewed by Hernando Today for this story.

“I was completely devastated, because those are the two people who have been the guiding force at the school,” another teacher said of Roth and Pearce.

Teachers paint a picture of Ferello as a brusque manager who dressed down teachers in the school hallways and clearly, as one teacher put it, “was in way over his head.” Sweeney, they say, was “aloof” and distant and “dropped the ball” on a few occasions.

But she’s the wife of the school board member known to be friendly with Superintendent Wayne Alexander, and so nepotism won out over merit and what was best for the school, teachers contend.

“This isn’t based on performance,” another teacher said. “This is based on who you like and the politics.”

That same refrain came from all of the teachers interviewed, though none would give their names citing fears of losing their own jobs.

“No one wants to get blackballed in the system,” one said.

Teachers also wonder whether the fact the Sweeneys have a child at Explorer had something to do with the decision to let Vivian Sweeney stay.

Alexander denies politics or favoritism were a factor in the decision not to reappoint Pearce and Roth – a decision made by Ferello and affirmed by Alexander.

Alexander said he trusts Ferello to give an appropriate recommendation based on performance. Everything else, he said, is “rumor and gossip” to which he won’t respond.

“Principals evaluate the performance of the assistant principals every minute of every day,” Alexander said. “Everyone has their right to their opinion on how they see events that occurred at the school.”

“There’s perception and there’s fact,” he said. “I deal with facts. I deal with performance. Your performance is measurable and observable.”

Evaluations of the administrators won’t be done until later this year, so there isn’t any documentation that explains why they were not reappointed.

Those evaluations will come in due time, Alexander said. But the district’s schedule for deciding reappointments requires principals to make decisions and recommendations to the superintendent earlier in the year.

When asked whether he would consider John Sweeney a friend, he replied: “That has nothing to do with the school’s performance.”

When asked why he moved Ferello, he said, “I think elementary school will be a better fit for him and his strengths.” He declined to say what he thought Ferello’s weaknesses are. Alexander’s evaluation of Ferello should shed more light on why he was reassigned after just one year.

Ferello on Friday declined to comment on his evaluations of his assistant principals, saying they would be made public record soon enough. When asked about favoritism, he said: “That’s not something that even needs to be commented on.”

He called himself “a fair guy.”

“Whenever you’re in leadership, there’s always a group that loves you, and a group that never likes you if you stand on your head,” Ferello said. “You have to expect that, especially when you’re in a smaller school district.”

Sweeney, Roth and Pearce did not return messages seeking comment for this story.

John Sweeney said rumors of favoritism are “to be expected” in a situation where a school board member is married to a district employee.

“You get into a public position, you have to have a thick skin,” he said.

But he called his wife “an excellent worker, an excellent employee and when there’s a job to get done, she does it.” He said he has “a working friendship” with Alexander and acknowledged the two play golf together occasionally.

“It’s not nefarious like people like to make it,” he said. “There’s nothing to hide.”

Glowing Reviews

Though there are no written evaluations for Roth, Pearce and Vivian Sweeney on their performance as assistant principals, their personnel files are packed with the glowing evaluations and reference letters that helped them get to Explorer.

All three women have masters of education degrees in educational leadership. The 49-year-old Roth’s educational experience dates back to 1994, when she started as a teacher at Deltona Elementary School. She remained there until being tapped for the Explorer post.

Sweeney, 48, held administrative assistant posts for the University of South Florida, and the Hillsborough County Attorney’s office before taking a full-time job in 2001 at Suncoast Elementary School. Before Explorer, she worked as a teacher at Fox Chapel Middle.

Pearce, 46, started as a kindergarten teacher in Virginia in 1985. She came on board in Hernando as a kindergarten and Title I lead teacher at Deltona, and before Explorer worked as a reading coach for the district.

All three earned high marks from evaluators during interviews for their assistant principal posts. Interviewers ranked them from 1 to 5, with 5 being the highest score, on qualities such as communication, decisiveness and critical thinking.

Sweeney and Roth had the largest number of 5’s on the sheet that denoted the consensus among the interviewers. But that potential didn’t necessarily translate to good leadership in Sweeney’s case, teachers said.

“People are afraid of her,” one teacher said. “People didn’t feel like they could go to her with a problem without feeling like they were putting their neck out.”

Teachers say Sweeney, who oversaw the middle school grades, failed to order instructional materials in a timely manner this year, a mistake that another assistant principal had to rectify. They said her door was often closed and she rarely attended after-school events.

Teachers also questioned Ferello’s ability to gauge a good administrator. Ferello, who most recently served as assistant principal of Sandpiper Elementary School in Ft. Lauderdale, clearly had problems adjusting to the new school, they said, citing a recent incident in which Ferello gave out incorrect information on how grades are weighted at the school.

Ferello denied that, saying he was only clarifying the policy that has remained consistent.

The sentiments expressed to Hernando Today are widespread among the Explorer staff, Hernando Classroom Teachers Association President Joe Vitalo said.

“They feel like there’s a lot of favoritism going on, and there’s nothing they can do,” Vitalo said.

Former school board member Jim Malcolm, who has taken an active role in the development of the Quest gifted center there, met with teachers in October who complained about Ferello’s abrasive management style and inability to handle a school that large.

“I’ve never experienced the outpouring of anger, frustration and concern in the 16 years I’d been on the board,” Malcolm said.

On Thursday, he met with about two dozen teachers who wanted to talk about the loss of Roth and Pearce. The mood was the same, he said, though teachers expressed relief Ferello would be moving on.

Malcolm also questioned the practice of sending assistant principals packing after such a short time.

“If there are shortcomings, you should say, ‘Let’s work on them and set goals,'” he said.

Roth and Pearce will be replaced by the district’s professional development director Barbara Kidder and curriculum specialist Dianne Azzarelli. Taking over for Ferello is Ray Pinder, the current principal at Fox Chapel Middle School.

Pinder is among Vivian Sweeney’s former bosses who during an evaluation last year said she has “a good rapport with co-workers.” When asked if she had “any areas of weakness,” Pinder said no, and on a scale of 1 to 10, he gave her a 10.

Reporter Tony Marrero can be reached at 352-544-5286 or lmarrero@hernandotoday.com.

Coral Bay Victims Claim $4.6M In Restitution

BROOKSVILLE –
Almost a year after he was sentenced to 20 years in prison, Steven Bartlett’s victims are staking a claim on their losses.

Collectively, there are 96 cases asking for $4.6 million in restitution.

Bartlett, former president of Coral Bay Construction Inc., was sentenced last April following his conviction for grand theft over $100,000. Prosecutors used more than 30,000 pages of evidence to prove Bartlett funded a lavish lifestyle with money intended to build homes.

Without that business capital, dozens of homes were left in various stages of completion when Coral Bay Construction folded. Some never saw their lots cleared.

The first resource available to victims was a state recovery fund housed in the Department of Business and Professional Regulation. But the Florida Homeowner’s Construction Recovery Fund caps claims at $500,000. And by January 2008, just 15 claims had tapped out the funds available to Coral Bay Construction victims.

This new restitution claim, filed last week, provides a new avenue for claiming damages.

But the odds of seeing a dime, “frankly are pretty slim,” said Assistant State Attorney Phil Hanson.

At this point, the case is still on appeal. The legal argument of criminal intent was never proven by the state. If the conviction is affirmed, then a restitution hearing might be in order, Hanson said.

Typically, a restitution hearing is delayed until a suspect leaves jail. That provides a way for the person to get a source of income and a judge can decide how the victims will be compensated. But with 19 years to go on Bartlett’s sentence, that’s not a likely route.

Even with an early hearing, “it’s an unwieldy situation with this many victims,” said Hanson.

His best advice for the victims at this juncture is to be happy with the prison sentence.

Among the victims making claims are Ronald and Julia Yeagle, who were left with only the unfinished shell of the home they paid for. They were compensated not with money but with blueprints and permits so they could finish the job with another contractor.

Their restitution claim is similar to the others. They paid $20,690 on their contract with Coral Bay Construction and another $24,816 out of pocket to avoid a lien from a contractor that wasn’t paid by Coral Bay Construction.

There is also a theoretical loss, what’s called loss of benefit of contract. For example, if a couple was willing to pay $100,000 for a home, but had to pay $150,000 to another homebuilder, the loss is counted as $50,000.

Julia Yeagle said their intention was to have a retirement home built here and move from Miami within a year. Construction didn’t begin for a year after signing the contract.

Between financing a new mortgage and scraping together the funds to finish the house, the Yeagles saw their savings evaporate. Their home in Miami has been sitting on the market for three years.

“This situation left us in a humongous mess,” Yeagle said.

They’re resigned to the fact their money will probably never be recovered.

“God has a master plan,” Yeagle said. “You just move forward.”

Reporter Kyle Martin can be reached at 352-544-5271 or kmartin@hernandotoday.com

Orchid Lovers

SPRING HILL –
Orchid Lovers Club of Spring Hill will present its Festival of Orchids show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday at the SNPJ Lodge located at 13383 County Line Road, one-quarter mile west of the Suncoast Parkway. Several vendors will be selling orchids and supplies, and a repotting service will be available.

County’s New Landfill Cell Is More Than A Dump

Recently, there has been a great deal of news coverage that has prompted concern about increased rates for garbage disposal in Hernando County due to alleged “delays” in permitting the Hernando County’s landfill expansion.

While the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) does not set garbage disposal fees, we are aware of these concerns. In fact, DEP made the determination to issue the permit on March 19.

Although a determination has been made, I wanted to take this opportunity to help readers understand the complicated process of permitting a landfill facility.

Contrary to the term used in your editorial, the landfill is not considered a “dump.”

Modern landfills are highly engineered facilities that are constructed with stringent specifications and quality assurance that are necessary to protect the public’s groundwater resources and the environment overall.

Designing and constructing landfill facilities in sinkhole prone areas like Hernando County can be even more complicated.

As many Hernando County residents may know, parts of Hernando County are prone to sinkhole development. In fact, several sinkholes occurred at the landfill property in 2003 and 2004.

To date, DEP has no evidence that these sinkholes occurred under a filled portion of the landfill; however, if a sinkhole opened up under the landfill, the Floridan Aquifer, which is a primary source of drinking water for Hernando County, could be contaminated.

DEP’s rules require that permit applicants provide reasonable assurance that the landfill design, construction and operation will not cause groundwater standards to be violated.

Working in conjunction with the applicant, DEP thoroughly reviews information regarding the stability of the site’s geology, detailed engineering designs, revisions and special design considerations that may be needed to ensure that state rules are addressed and drinking water is protected.

The county has agreed to put in place additional engineering design and construction requirements that DEP believes will provide the necessary protections for the environment.

We remain committed to working with all of our permit applicants to ensure protection and preservation of Florida’s natural resources.

Deborah Getzoff, director

Southwest District Office Florida Department of Environmental Protection

Old West Show Coming To Town April 26

Nazdar

Wanted! From the 1880s’ Old West, another mystery dinner show fundraiser on Sunday, April 26, at 5 p.m. “Bordello of The Damned.” This is not just another night at the Masaryktown Saloon and Bordello; it will be more deadly than usual. Cost is $15 per person, which includes dinner and dessert. There will be a cash bar and a costume contest. There is limited seating, and tickets are going fast. For an early roundup of tickets and more information and tickets, call Becky at 352-397-3758.

Big thank yous from the community on the recent polka dance, which was a success. And from Holy Trinity Lutheran Church on their very successful spaghetti dinner dance at VFW Post 8681. The proceeds went to the food pantry. Whatever food that is not donated has to be bought, and currently they are feeding 60 to 80 folks weekly. So if you can help, please do so.

Sunday, at our big Masaryktown birthday celebration dinner and dance at the Community Hall on Lincoln Avenue, added to the program besides, “The Beseda,” back from New York, Steve Aldridge and Malia Ondrejka will entertain you. Serving starts at 11:30 a.m. and if you just want to dance, the cost is $6.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, at the Harmony House Family Restaurant. The restaurant will be open 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. They will serve corned beef and cabbage. Located on U.S. 41 south next to the Handy Plaza. Their head baker and chef, Pete, has created a new raspberry torte. This makes No. 8 in the torte line of flavors, besides the strudels and napoleons. For more information, call 848-0828.

Autumn Blaha came home from St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, for a short day visit end of February visiting family and close friends. Then off to Pensacola with Mom Dee Blaha and Grandmother Jean Lane of Brooksville (who went so they could have more time with Autumn.) Autumn was an attendant at her college friend’s wedding. Then back off to the islands. She and her boyfriend Nick Terry of Milwaukee, Wis. are planning to leave St. Croix in May and continue to travel and dive (work) in the waters of Belize. Dee and Mike are filing for passports. What else would parents do?

The Blahas have also practiced natural and chemical hormone and antibiotic free meats, and vegetables, and even natural pet food and bones. They have now added a CSA (customer supported agriculture) program.

They will now year round add to the value of meats, eggs to a typical veggie plan only. You can check out their Web site at www.rabbitsetc.us for current information on rabbits, etc., at the Blaha Farm.

They also have composted worm manure for your own soil. You are welcome to a tour of their farm in the middle of Masaryktown, but please call 352-796-0459, as they work the farm and cannot stop at any time. Call and they will be delighted to make arrangements for a tour.

On Feb. 29, Helen Havens, her daughter Helen Parsolano and daughters/granddaughters Stephanie and Rebecca Parsolano attended a baby shower in St. Petersburg at the home of Mrs. Kathleen Norsteins, overlooking the bay. The shower was for Helen’s great-grandson, Logan Maximus Chintoyloy. He was born on Jan. 29 and weighed 6 pounds 3 ounces. Proud parents are Roger and Kathleen Chintoyloy of Orlando.

More than 30 guests enjoyed a spectacular array of finger foods. All had a very delightful time.

Sympathies, get wells & birthdays

Sympathies to the Evans family. Mark, Becky and daughter Chelsea and Alison were in Danville, Va. for several weeks last month. They attended the funeral of 89-year-old father of Becky, George Savage, who passed on Feb. 16.

Get well wishes to our town secretary Linda Lovelady who is home convalescing. We wish you a speedy recovery.

Happy birthdays: Jenna Forte, Cathy Bond, Adeline Meyhoff, March 15; Helen Havens, Andrea Holmes, March 16; Linda Alexsuk, Samantha Coney, March 17; Larry Farrow, Philip Undestad, Don Wilcox, Kody Stampler, Myrtle Hentachel, March 18; James Carter, Marion Schlott, Joseph Gottsman, Jim Loughen, March 19; Goldie Johnson, March 20; Kendell Hebert, Jane Turner, March 21.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day, y’all.

S Bohom